The words to the Ah Misirlou, your magical exotic beauty Will drive me crazy, I can’t stand it anymore Ah I will steal you from Arabia. The song sounds very similar to Soy Bomb.

My black-eyed crazy Misirlou My life changes with a kiss Misirlou is a song by Dick Dale, and is the 3rd (or 4th in the Xbox 360 Version) song in the 8th tier, and is known for it's long continuous fast-strumming with a faster tempo and riff than the original. The Misirlou dance also found its way into the Armenian-American community who, like the Greeks, were fond of line dancing, and occasionally adopted Greek dances. The Misirlou dance also found its way into the Armenian-American community who, like the Greeks, were fond of line dancing, and occasionally adopted Greek dances. BACKGROUND: Misirlou, the tune, was published as sheet music in the 1930s by Nicholas Roubanis, a Columbia University musical scholar and professor. The first Armenian version of "Misirlou" was recorded by Reuben Sarkisian in Fresno the early 1950s. The first Armenian version of "Misirlou" was recorded by Reuben Sarkisian in Fresno the early 1950s. MISIRLOU Greek : PRONUNCIATION: mih-sihr-LOO : TRANSLATION: A girl's name : SOURCE: Monte Mayo, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, taught Misirlou in 1948 at the Oglebay Folk Dance Camp in Wheeling, West Virginia. BACKGROUND: Misirlou, the tune, was published as sheet music in the 1930s by Nicholas Roubanis. The Misirlou dance also found its way into the Armenian-American community who, like the Greeks, were fond of line dancing, and occasionally adopted Greek dances. Misirlou – Glikeria – English Lyrics. According to this story, Professor Brunhilde Corsch at Duquesne University, a private Catholic institution, approached Mercine Nesotas to teach some Greek dances to this group. Misirlou is a song (see Misirlou under MUSIC) Also see Kritiko Syrto, Haniotikos under Living Dances As stated below, Misirlou the dance came out of an attempt to perform Kritiko Syrto at a time when Greek music was very hard to come by in the USA outside of Greek immigrant communities. MISIRLOU Greek PRONUNCIATION: mih-sihr-LOO TRANSLATION: Misirlou is named for Misiri, an Egyptian girl's name SOURCE: Dick Oakes learned this dance from John Filcich. A folk dance group in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in the United States created a line dance to the song "Misirlou" in 1945. For this dance we choose a beautiful music by Mikis Theodorakis song called Sto Perigiali and sa... Youtube Singing Songs Entertainment Children Videos Artist Greece Music The first Armenian version of "Misirlou" was recorded by Reuben Sarkisian in Fresno the early 1950s. The first Armenian version of "Misirlou" was recorded by Reuben Sarkisian in Fresno the early 1950s.